Introduction

Module One

Module Two

Module Three

Module Four

Readings

Assignments

Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ)

Below is one of the most famous of all the questionnaires that seek to capture the dimensions of leadership. J. Hemphill and A Coons developed the original LBDQ in the 1950s. The version below was developed by Andrew Halpin and used in his doctoral dissertation in 1957. It was modified into several different versions that added both complexity and items to it during the days of the Ohio State research studies in leadership. During the post WWII years there was a great deal of interest in leadership but no satisfactory theory or definition of the factors that constituted leadership. The LBDQ is famous for introducing two dimensions of leadership (consideration and initiation of structure or task orientation) that have remained very much a constant in leadership studies. The LBDQ is published by the Bureau of Business Research, College of Commerce and Administration, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH The version presented below was copyrighted in 1957 and may still be ordered if you wish to use it.

Interestingly, while widely used, the original instrument was gender specific and each question used male pronouns. It has not, to my knowledge, been examined for its internal validity for female administrators. In the version below, I have added female pronouns but do not know if particular items will be valid when a respondent has a women leader in mind.

This version of the LBDQ is used to describe an organizational leader. I should like you to use it to describe either the top administrator in your organization or in an educational organization that you know well.  Realize this means not only using the instrument to assess your leader but also reflecting upon whether or not the LBDQ captures this person.  So, please include this reflection with your completed LBDQ.



Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire

Name (or Position Title) of Leader Being Described:

Name of Organization:

On the following pages is a list of items that may be used to describe the behavior of your supervisor. Each item describes a specific kind of behavior, but does not ask you to judge whether the behavior is desirable or undesirable. This is not a test of ability. It simply asks you to describe as accurately as you can the behavior of your supervisor.

Note: the term "group" as employed in the following items refers to a department, division or other unit of organization which is supervised by the person being described.

Note: the term "members" refers to all the people in the unit of the organization which is supervised by the person being described.

Directions:

Read each item carefully.

Think about how frequently the leader engages in the behavior described by the item.

Decide whether s/he always, often, occasionally, seldom or never acts as described by the item.

Draw a circle around one of the five letters following the item to show the answer you have selected.

A = Always

B = Often

C = Occasionally

D = Seldom

E = Never

1. S/he does personal favors for group members.

A

B

C

D

E

2. S/he makes her/his attitudes clear to the group. A B C D E

A

B

C

D

E

3.

S/he does little things to make it pleasant to be a member of the group.

A

B

C

D

E

4.

S/he tries out his new ideas with the group.

A

B

C

D

E

5.

S/he acts as the real leader of the group.

A

B

C

D

E

6.

S/he is easy to understand.

A

B

C

D

E

7.

S/he rules with an iron hand.

A

B

C

D

E

8.

S/he finds time to listen to group members.

A

B

C

D

E

9.

S/he criticizes poor work.

A

B

C

D

E

10.

S/he gives advance notice of changes.

A

B

C

D

E

11.

S/he speaks in a manner not to be questioned.

A

B

C

D

E

12.

S/he keeps to her/himself.

A

B

C

D

E

13.

S/he looks out for the personal welfare of individual group members.

A

B

C

D

E

14. S/h assigns group members to particular tasks.

A

B

C

D

E

15.

S/he is the spokesman of the group.

A

B

C

D

E

16.

S/he schedules the work to be done.

A

B

C

D

E

17.

S/he maintains definite standards of performance.

A

B

C

D

E

18.

S/he refuses to explain her/his actions.

A

B

C

D

E

19.

S/he keeps the group informed.

A

B

C

D

E

20.

S/he acts without consulting the group.

A

B

C

D

E

21.

S/he backs up the members in their actions.

A

B

C

D

E

22.

S/he emphasizes the meeting of deadlines.

A

B

C

D

E

23.

S/he treats all group members as her/his equals.

A

B

C

D

E

24.

S/he encourages the use of uniform procedures.

A

B

C

D

E

25.

S/he gets what s/he asks for from her/his superiors.

A

B

C

D

E

26.

S/he is willing to make changes.

A

B

C

D

E

27. S/he makes sure that her/his part in the organization is understood by group members.

A

B

C

D

E

28.

S/he is friendly and approachable.

A

B

C

D

E

29.

S/he asks that group members follow standard rules and regulations.

A

B

C

D

E

30.

S/he fails to take necessary action.

A

B

C

D

E

31.

S/he makes group members feel at ease when talking with them.

A

B

C

D

E

32.

S/he lets group members know what is expected of them.

A

B

C

D

E

33.

S/he speaks as the representative of the group.

A

B

C

D

E

34.

S/he puts suggestions made by the group into action.

A

B

C

D

E

35.

S/he sees to it that group members are working up to capacity.

A

B

C

D

E

36. S/he lets other people take away her/his leadership in the group.

A

B

C

D

E

37.

S/he gets her/his superiors to act for the welfare of the group.

A

B

C

D

E

38.

S/he gets group approval in important matters before going ahead.

A

B

C

D

E

39.

S/he sees to it that the work of the group members is coordinated.

A

B

C

D

E

40.

S/he keeps the group working together as a team.

A

B

C

D

E

There are two factors in this instrument: Consideration and Initiating Structure (to be understood also as Task Orientation).

Consideration: Items 1, 3, 6, 8, 12, 13, 18, 20, 21, 23, 26, 28, 31, 34, and 38

Initiating Structure: Items 2, 4, 7, 9, 11, 14, 16, 17, 22, 24, 27, 29, 32, 35, 39

Items Not Used: 5, 10, 15, 19, 25, 30, 33, 36, 37, 40

To score: Add up the scores for the two factors as follows: A = 5; B = 4; C = 3; D = 2; E = 1.

This produces a raw score for each factor. Then calculate a mean and standard deviation if you intend to use the results for research over a sample or population. For individuals, the raw score can indicate the degree to which that individual sees the leader as favoring one factor over another.

 


mbryant1@unl.edu

http://tc.unl.edu/mbryant