May 2017 graduate spotlights: Speech-language pathology master's degrees


May 2017 graduate spotlights: Speech-language pathology master's degrees

04 May 2017    By Kelcey Buck

Kirsten Campbell  |  Christopher Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada

Bachelor of Science in Communication Disorders, Minot State University

Kirsten CampbellWhat made you interested in speech-language pathology?
After coaching through middle and high school, I knew I wanted to work with people, but I didn’t know what field I’d like to be in. My high school psychology teacher suggested speech-language pathology in the fall of my senior year so I looked into it, not knowing what an SLP really did. During my research, I fell in love with the idea of being able to help people communicate with their friends and family. 

What made you choose Nebraska’s speech-language pathology program for your graduate work?
I was drawn to the broad range of classes that Nebraska offers from right hemisphere disorders to cleft palate. I had also heard great things about the Barkley Clinic and was interested in experiencing externships in both the medical and school setting. Lastly, the program has many professors who have contributed significantly to the field of speech-language pathology and I wanted the opportunity to learn from them.

What has been the most rewarding aspect of studying speech-language pathology at Nebraska?
I have greatly appreciated the variety of settings I’ve gotten to work in and the variety of people and communication disorders I’ve gotten to work with. As a graduate student at Nebraska, I have gotten to experience hospitals, elementary and middle schools, a skilled nursing facility, and an AAC preschool, as well as a variety of clients in the Barkley Clinic itself. 

What’s next?
I am excited to begin my clinical fellowship year as a speech-language pathologist at the Columbus Care and Rehab Center in Columbus, Nebraska!

Allyssa LaRose  |  Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada

Bachelor of Science in Communication Disorders, Minot State University

Allyssa LaRoseWhat made you interested in speech-language pathology?
What interested me the most about speech-language pathology was that it allowed me to be able to help and teach so many different people. I thought it was amazing that it would give me the opportunity to work with adults and kids from various cultures and backgrounds and to work in so many different settings, from schools to hospitals to skilled nursing facilities. What was even more intriguing about this profession was that I would get to work on so many different skills including speech, language, alternative and augmentative communication, swallowing, cognition and the various branches within those categories. I would get to help people communicate, learn, rehabilitate, and achieve incredible goals. Speech-language pathology is anything but ordinary and I may not have known how amazing of a profession it was when I started my freshman year of college, but I lucked out because I love everything about it!

What made you choose Nebraska’s speech-language pathology program for your graduate work? 
Choosing Nebraska’s speech-language pathology program was a huge decision for me as it was so far away from my home and my undergraduate school, and I didn't know anyone here. I chose Nebraska because I wanted to learn from the best researchers, professors, and clinicians. I wanted to be challenged to learn and work towards my greatest potential. I wanted to have the opportunity to learn from speech-language pathologists who were as great as I hoped to be one day. This program met all my expectations and more, and I never expected to be so well prepared and confident to enter this profession as I am now. Choosing Nebraska was the best decision I could have ever made.

What has been the most rewarding aspect of studying speech-language pathology at Nebraska?
The most rewarding aspect has by far been my clinical placements. Nebraska’s program does a phenomenal job of giving each of us incredible clinical experiences from the Barkley clinic, to student teaching placements, to medical externships. I have had the opportunity to experience so many wonderful people and have an impact on their lives. Not only was I able to impact the lives of each individual that I worked with, but I learned so much about myself as I really got to know each of them and was able to share pieces of myself with them. I have had incredible supervisors at each of my placements who encouraged me, challenged me, and taught by example. I could not have asked for better supervisors or placements to prepare me for entering this profession.

What’s next?
I have accepted a position with Omaha Public Schools and am excited to be working in a middle school. I also really enjoyed my time at my medical externship, so I hope to also work some weekends/holidays/summers at a medical setting part-time once I get settled into my middle school. The great thing about speech-language pathology is that you don't have to choose one setting or population to work with for the rest of your life. We have so many options!

Jess Salley  |  Andover, Massachusetts

Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of New Hampshire

Jess SalleyWhat made you interested in speech-language pathology?
In high school, I taught adaptive physical education classes, opening my eyes to the field of special education. One of the students in my class sustained a traumatic brain injury as a child, and after hearing about his recovery and experiences in speech therapy, I was hooked.

What made you choose Nebraska’s speech-language pathology program for your graduate work?
Nebraska’s academic, clinical and research opportunities not only fit my interests in traumatic brain injury, but also offered experiences to expand my knowledge and skills in the entire field. Upon visiting the university and exploring the Midwest for the first time, the welcoming environment of both the department and the city of Lincoln made the program a perfect fit.

What has been the most rewarding aspect of studying speech-language pathology at Nebraska?
Seeing the growth in my clients while experiencing my own personal and professional growth has made my graduate career at Nebraska incredibly rewarding. I’ve been able to impact people’s lives, explore a new area of the United States, and establish life-long relationships with my peers and faculty members.

What’s next?
I am moving back to Massachusetts to complete my clinical fellowship in the neurogenic rehabilitation setting and will be applying to Ph.D. programs for the fall of 2018.


Special Education and Communication Disorders