Munroe-Meyer Institute

Munroe-Meyer Institute at the University of Nebraska Medical Center

  • Intensive Applied Behavior Analysis Program Match Code - 141615 (3 positions)
  • Comprehensive School Mental Health Program - 141621 (2 positions)
  • Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Match Code - 141617 (12 positions)
  • Rural Integrated Care Program North/Central Match Code - 141614 (2 positions)
  • Rural Integrated Care Program West Match Code - 141620 (1 position)
  • Rural Integrated Care Program Southeast Match Code - 141618 (1 position)
  • Intertribal Behavioral Health Program - 141623 (3 positions)

Munroe-Meyer Institute is an academic unit located within the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, NE. The University of Nebraska Medical Center is a leader in academic health sciences and our enterprise is vital to Nebraska, the nation's heartland communities and beyond. Take a virtual campus tour to experience UNMC.

Interns training with MMI provide clinical services on campus through MMI Clinics and Nebraska Medicine hospitals as well as in schools, community-based primary care clinics and community agencies throughout Nebraska. MMI also provides state-wide technical assistance, continuing education, and consultation to public schools, behavioral health agencies, and other programs providing services to children, youth, and adults. Referrals to MMI are made by pediatricians, schools, and parents seeking treatment, second opinions, or interdisciplinary assessments for children and adolescents. Professional staff members at MMI are organized within disciplines that include Psychology, Special Education, Clinical Genetics, Developmental Medicine, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech Pathology, Social Work, Recreation Therapy, Nutrition, Nursing, Genetics Laboratories and the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders.



MMI Programs and Rotations

Applicants have separate programs to consider at MMI: the Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care program, Rural Integrated Care Program, and the Intensive Applied Behavior Analysis Program.  Applicants interview with, rank, and are matched with these programs separately. Interns will do all of their rotations within a single program.

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program: 

Rotations are available in which trainees learn outpatient behavioral assessment and treatment techniques for common developmental and behavioral problems encountered by children, adolescents, and their families, including problems such as noncompliance, tantrums, ADHD, disruptive school behavior, adjustment disorders, anxiety, depression, habit disorders, etc. Outpatient behavioral management services also are provided for children with developmental disabilities. Some rotations provide "specialized" behavioral health training opportunities (depending upon the faculty supervisor) in areas such as sleep disorders, academic problems, pain and stress related disorders, neuropsychology, and school-based mental health. Other rotations focus on providing behavioral health services directly into primary care clinics. In these clinics, interns learn to work alongside physicians and staff in the community in both urban and suburban sites throughout Omaha and eastern Nebraska. Through these experiences, interns can expect to learn how best to integrate into the culture of primary care while providing evidence-based treatment. Interns in these rotations also have monthly team meetings to discuss pragmatic issues endemic to integration of behavioral health services and research into primary care.

Rural Integrated Care Program:

This program is not a rotation, but a rural living and learning experience. Applicants will interview for, rank, and be matched separately with tracks/placements located in the North, Central, Southeast, and West areas of the state.

  • Rural Integrated Care Program - North/Central Track:  Interns will have the opportunity to learn outpatient behavioral assessment and treatment techniques in primary care settings across rural Nebraska, working alongside physicians and other health professionals. Interns will work and live in one of the following towns in Nebraska for this track: Norfolk, NE or Kearney, NE. Interns will learn outpatient behavioral assessment and treatment techniques for common developmental and behavioral problems encountered by children, adolescents, and their families, including problems such as noncompliance, tantrums, ADHD, disruptive school behavior, adjustment disorders, anxiety, depression, habit disorders, etc. Outpatient services for children with developmental disabilities are also provided. Other opportunities may involve performing school consultation and/or interventions. Monthly didactics will be provided via telehealth connections and monthly team meetings with all interns working in integrated care are scheduled to discuss pragmatic issues endemic to integration of behavioral health services and research into primary care. These experiences allow the intern to learn how best to integrate into the culture of primary care while providing evidence-based behavioral health services. Funding will also be provided for interns to travel to Beatrice, Lincoln and Omaha throughout the year (and for housing when overnights are required) for large group seminars of all interns in the Nebraska Internship Consortium.
  • Rural Integrated Care Program - West Track:  In this unique track, interns will have the opportunity to learn outpatient behavioral assessment and treatment techniques in primary care settings across rural Nebraska, working alongside physicians and other health professionals. An intern in this track will work and live in the Rushville/Chadron area in the western part of the state and serve clinics across sites in the area. Interns will learn outpatient behavioral assessment and treatment techniques for common developmental and behavioral problems encountered by children, adolescents, and their families, including problems such as noncompliance, tantrums, ADHD, disruptive school behavior, adjustment disorders, anxiety, depression, habit disorders, etc. Outpatient services for children with developmental disabilities and interdisciplinary clinics (e.g., Genetics clinic) are also provided. Other opportunities may involve performing school consultation and/or interventions. Monthly didactics will be provided via telehealth connections and monthly team, peer, and group supervision meetings with all interns working in integrated care are scheduled to discuss pragmatic issues endemic to integration of behavioral health services and research into primary care. These experiences allow the intern to learn how best to integrate into the culture of primary care while providing evidence-based behavioral health services. Funding for travel (and for housing when overnights are required) is provided for the intern in this track to travel to four monthly seminars in person in Kearney, Lincoln, Beatrice, or Omaha, NE, with the larger NICPP intern cohort.

Rural Integrated Care Program - Southeast Track:  Interns will work as part of the behavioral health team at the largest rural hospital in southeast Nebraska. Major learning opportunities will be in family practice, pediatric, and internal medicine outpatient clinics working alongside psychologists and collaboratively with medical professionals. Interns will learn outpatient assessment and evidence-based therapy techniques for patients across the lifespan and with a variety of referral concerns. For children, adolescents, and their families, treatments are frequently for noncompliance/tantrums, ADHD, disruptive school behavior, Autism Spectrum Disorders, anxiety, depression, and trauma. For adults, the most common treatments are for anxiety, depression, trauma, weight loss, smoking cessation (or other health-related behavior change), relationship issues, emotional problems, peripartum anxiety/depression, or life changes/adjustment disorders. Minor learning opportunities may be tailored to the intern’s interest and could include crisis/emergency behavioral health services, substance use disorder treatment, program evaluation, developmental disability assessment, supervision of doctoral students, or school consultation. Interns will participate in grand rounds with the behavioral health team to coordinate care. Interns will attend monthly didactics and team meetings with other MMI interns as well as large group seminars of all interns in the Nebraska Internship Consortium.

Comprehensive School Mental Health Program:

One slot is available in advanced training in school-based mental health services, clinical practice, and innovative research. The program is designed to train future school-based practitioners in skills to improve access to a continuum of high-quality comprehensive school mental and behavioral health services. Specifically, trainees provide a full continuum of mental and behavioral health services including mental health promotion (e.g., universal mental health screening; school-wide positive behavior supports), prevention (e.g., mental health services in small groups; class wide mental health promotion), and intervention (e.g., intensive behavior intervention support; individual and family therapy) to youth and families directly in the community through a school placement. Through these experiences, trainees facilitate development of comprehensive school based psychological services within their school setting, which includes direct service delivery of evidence-based prevention, intervention, consultation, assessment, and mental/behavioral health promotion for youth across the developmental span.

Intertribal Behavioral Health Program:

This program is a unique, specialized living and learning experience. Interns will work collaboratively alongside psychologists from Morningstar Counseling and Consultation, P.C., (MCC) who have extensive experience in treating trauma, issues in diversity, and serving rural and reservation areas. MCC is committed to increasing the number of psychology professionals with culturally aware training and clinical experiences to serve Native/American Indian communities. MCC’s guiding philosophy for the psychology training program is to equip developing professionals in psychology with the skills required to serve the diverse and complex mental health needs of Native/American Indians living on reservations and within rural communities. This focus ultimately serves to reduce health disparities among Native/American Indian peoples while providing psychology interns with diverse and comprehensive training opportunities. These training opportunities include outpatient treatment, school consultation and treatment within the Omaha Nation and Winnebago reservations, the Omaha Nation Public Schools, the Winnebago Public Schools, collaborative opportunities with Carl T. Curtis Health Education Center, and collaboration with community partners. 

 Interns training with Morningstar can expect to receive didactic training in life on the reservation, Native/American Indian Behavioral Health, Historical and Intergenerational Trauma, Cultural Healing Practices, and a thorough introduction to life on the reservation within the Omaha Nation and Winnebago Public School systems. They will also receive training in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) that has been adapted to working specifically with the Native/American Indian community. These training techniques will guide interns in the treatment of multiple forms of trauma, grief, adjustment disorders, and other serious emotional disturbances.  There will be opportunities to administer assessments to children for PTSD, ADHD, depression, anxiety, and other disorders that impact daily functioning.  Interns will receive training, and introduction to Morningstar and our community partners as part of their orientation as they are becoming familiar with our site. Through a developmental model of supervision, interns will have the opportunity to observe/shadow MCC clinical staff during the intake process, and on-going sessions, prior to taking on their own caseload. We hope this will reduce any anxiety about working with the community and help interns feel more knowledgeable about Native/American Indian behavioral health needs prior to seeing clients. Our goal is that as interns move through the internship year, they will begin to work more independently and begin to create their own collaborations and professional relationships within the reservation and nearby communities.

Intensive Applied Behavior Analysis Program: 

Rotations are available in which trainees learn applied behavior analytic assessment and treatment techniques for a wide range of presenting problems related to skill acquisition and behavior reduction. Four experiences are offered through the Intensive ABA (IABA) program: Severe Behavior, Pediatric Feeding, Early Intervention, and Diagnostic Clinics. Interns who match with the IABA track will select two, 6-month rotations or one, 12-month rotation from the options mentioned above. Interns participating in the Severe Behavior, Pediatric Feeding, Early Intervention will also complete a mini rotation in the Diagnostic Clinics each month. Across rotation experiences interns will experience a both depth and breadth of presenting behavioral concerns, skill level, and diagnosis. In the Severe Behavior rotation interns will participate in functional analysis, development of function-based treatment, generalization of treatment, and caregiver training for individuals with severe destructive behavior (e.g., aggression, self-injury, pica, etc.). In the Pediatric Feeding rotation interns will participate in functional analysis, development of function-based treatment, generalization of treatment, and caregiver training for individuals with severe feeding difficulties (e.g., food selectivity, food refusal). In the Early Intervention rotation interns will participate in functional behavioral assessment, skill assessment using evidence-based assessment, and establish generalization and maintenance of goals.  Interns in the Diagnostic Clinics will participate in the interdisciplinary Autism Spectrum Disorder Evaluation, Severe Behavior Evaluation, and parent training.

Professional Development Training

Interns and Fellows attend monthly professional development activities that are provided through weekly research and professional development presentations, monthly interdisciplinary leadership seminars, regular case conferences, and attendance at Pediatric Grand Rounds. A sample of recent topics from weekly professional development presentations includes:

  • Behavior Management of Sleep Disorders
  • Cultural Sensitivity in Multidisciplinary Services for Individuals with Disabilities
  • Setting up a Behavioral Health Services Private Practice in a Primary Care Setting
  • Behavior Management of Medical Adherence
  • Family-Centered Care
  • Doing Clinical Research in a Medical Setting
  • Management of Post-Traumatic Reactions to Terrorist Acts
  • Family Adaptation to Diabetes
  • Job Interviewing and Negotiating
  • Grant Writing
  • Behavioral Pain Management

Research Training

All interns are expected to participate in ongoing interdisciplinary and clinical research. (Faculty in bold, interns in italics.)

  • Banks, B., Shriver, M., Chadwell, M., Allen, K.D. (2018). An Examination of Behavioral Treatment Wording on Acceptability and Understanding.  Behavioral Interventions, 1-11.  
  • Clarke, B. L., Rispoli, K. M., Gelbar, N. W., & Bray, M. A. (2017). Equity-based practices in early childhood: The role of the school psychologist. Perspectives on Early Childhood Psychology and Education, 2, 129-148.
  • Clarke, B. L., Wheeler, L., Sheridan, S., Witte, A., Sommerhalder, M., Timberlake, E. (2017). Supporting Latino success via family-school partnerships: Preliminary effects of Conjoint Behavioral Consultation on student and parent outcomes. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation.
  • Cohenour, J., Volkert, V., Allen, K.D. (2018).  An experimental demonstration of AAB renewal in children with autism spectrum disorder.  Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.  Article DOI: 10.1002/jeab.443
  • Hoffses, K., Riley, A., Menousek, K., Schellinger, K., Grennan, A., Cammarata, C., & Steadman, J. (2017). Professional Practices, Training, and Funding Mechanisms: A Survey of Pediatric Primary Care Psychologists. Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology, 5, 39–49. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cpp0000173
  • Keeler, H.J., Sjuts, T., Kosuke, K., Watanabe-Galloway, S., Mackie, P.F.E., Liu, H. (2018). Virtual mentorship network to address the rural shortage of mental health providers. American Journal of Preventative Medicine.
  • LaBrot, Z. C., Dufrene, B. A., Pasqua, J. L., Radley, K. C., Olmi, D. J., Bates-Brantley, K., Helbig, K., Melendez, M., & Murphy, A. (2018). A comparison of two function-based interventions:  NCR vs. DRO in preschool classrooms.  Preventing School Failure, 62(3), 161-175.
  • Burt, J., Garbacz, S., Kupzyk, K., Gathje, R., & Frerichs, L. (2014). Examining the utility of behavioral health integration in well-child visits: Implications for rural settings. Families, Systems, and Health, 32, 20-30.
  • Valleley, R., Evans, J., O’Dell, S., & Allen, K. (2014). Developmental screening in rural primary care: Real world application. Clinical Pediatrics, 53(9), 900–905
  • Allen, K.D, Kuhn, B.R., DeHaai, K. & Wallace, D.P. (2013). Evaluation of a behavioral treatment package to reduce sleep problems in children with Angelman Syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34, 676-686.
  • Allen, K.D., & Wallace, D.W. (2013). Effectiveness of using noncontingent escape for general behavior management in a pediatric dental clinic. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 46, 723-737.
  • Ellis, C.R., Schnoes, C.J., & Roberts, H.J. Childhood Habit Behaviors and Stereotypic Movement Disorder. Medscape Reference. Updated September 16, 2013. Available at:http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/914071-overview.
  • Howard, M., Burke, R. & Allen, K.D. (2013) An evaluation of the impact of the observer effect on treatment integrity in a day treatment center for children. Behavior Modification, 37(4), 490-515. doi:10.1177/0145445513486801
  • Mathews, T.L., Erfritz-Gay, K., Knight, J., Lancaster, B. & Kupzyk, K. (2013). The effects of social skills group training on children with high functioning autism and disruptive behavior disorders. Children’s Health Care, 42, 311-332.
  • Segool, N., Meadows, T., Roberts, H., Thorson, R., Dogan, R., & Evans, J. (2013). The effect of location on psychotropic treatment practices among pediatricians. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 34, 22-30.

Benefits 

For interns in all MMI predoctoral psychology internship programs, benefits include 15 days paid time off,  UNMC student health insurance, office space, an individual computer/laptop, access to the internet and online statistical packages as well as online library search engines, unlimited copying and phone services, and media services. The annual stipend is $28,352.  

Past Interns' Current Employment Settings

The Munroe-Meyer Institute has trained interns with widely varying backgrounds, experiences, and professional aspirations. All have a common goal of pursing clinical, research, and/or teaching positions in the service of children, youth, and families of children and youth with common adjustment/behavior problems as well as those with more severe handicapping conditions and developmental disabilities. Interns have gone on to meet these goals in a wide variety of clinical, school, academic, medical, and private practice settings, including:

Medical/Hospital Settings
Munroe-Meyer Institute/UNMC, NE 
Geisinger Health System

Nemours A.I. duPont Hospital for Children

Oregon Health & Science University

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Eastern State Hospital, VA
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Southeast Hospital, Mandeville, LA
University of South Dakota School of Medicine

Louisiana State University Medical Center

Private Practice
Lincoln Pediatric Group, NE
Great Plains Clinic, ND
Heartspring Program, KS 
Mankato Clinic, MN
Pediatric Associates, Iowa City, IA
Language Development Program, NY
Kearney Clinic, NE
Partners in Behavioral Milestones, KS
Columbus Pediatrics, NE

Public Schools
Gig Harbor Schools, WA 
Biloxi Schools, MS 
Phoenix Public Schools, AZ 
Sarasota Schools, FL 
LaGrange Schools, IL 
Wamego Public Schools, KS

Academic Departments
Brock University, Canada 
East Tennessee State University 
Florida State University 
Kent State University 
Louisiana State University 
Mississippi State University 
North Carolina State University 
Texas A&M University 
University of Southern Mississippi 
University of Cincinnati 
University of Oregon 
University of Nebraska-Lincoln 
University of Nebraska-Omaha

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 
Utah State University 
West Virginia University

Behavioral Pediatrics Program Faculty

Keith D. Allen, Ph.D., BCBA-D
West Virginia University, 1987

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Pediatric pain management, health-related behavior in children, parent training, stress-related disorders, autism, child management during invasive medical and dental procedures. Publications include articles in Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Therapy, Headache, Pediatric Dentistry, Child and Family Behavior Therapy.

Jennifer Burt, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, 2008

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Courtney Burnette, Ph.D.
University of Miami–Miami, Florida 2006 

 

Integrated Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders; autism screening and evaluation, training

Integrated behavioral health in primary care, school-based mental health, screening in primary care, trauma, ADHD, parenting training, anxiety, mood disorders, and group-based therapy for mood disorders and anxiety. Publications include articles in Early Child Development and Care.

Mindy Chadwell, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, 2015

Comprehensive School Mental Health Program Faculty

 

Integrating behavioral health into primary care, early childhood behavioral intervention, the impact of trauma on behavioral health, academic and school related problems, childhood sleep concerns, therapeutic relationship, internalizing disorders, externalizing disorders. Publications include articles in Contemporary School Psychology.

Brandy L. Clarke, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2007

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Integrated Primary Care, School Mental Health, Early Childhood Development and Intervention, Training and Technical Assistance, Grantwriting. Publications include articles in Psychology in the Schools, Early Education and Development, Journal of Rural Mental Health, Infant Mental Health Journal, Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community.

 

Amy Drayton, Ph.D.
Eastern Michigan University–Ypsilanti, Michigan, 2010 

 

Assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorders

Joseph H. Evans, Ph.D.
University of Kansas, 1974

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Integrated behavioral health in primary care, rural pediatric behavioral health, dissemination research, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, adolescent behavior. Publications include articles in Journal of Rural Mental Health; Pediatrics; Families, Systems & Health; Child and Family Behavior Therapy

 

Nancy Foster, Ph.D.
Mississippi State University, 2005

Rural Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Rural outreach; disruptive behavior disorders; ADHD; learning problems; developmental disability; feeding, toileting, and sleep problems. Publications include articles in Journal of Rural Mental Health; Families, Systems & Health.

 

Erika Franta, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2018

Comprehensive School Mental Health Program Faculty

 

School-based mental health and consultation, Psychoeducational assessment, data-based problem solving and decision making, violence risk assessment, and prevention, evaluation, and treatment of youth involved in the juvenile justice system.

 

Allison Grennan, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, 2012

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Integrating behavioral health into primary care, parent training, internalizing disorders, externalizing disorders, studying the impact of behavioral health clinics in primary care settings, integrating psychology into well child visits, depression screening in primary care. Publications include articles in Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, Families, Systems, & Health, Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology, and Early Childhood Research Quarterly

 

Bethany Hansen, Ph.D.
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 2014

Intensive Applied Behavior Analysis Program Faculty

 

Integrated Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders; autism screening and evaluation, early intervention

 

Sara Jeglum, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Madison– Madison, Wisconsin, 2020 

 

Integrated Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders; Diagnosis, Training

Christian N. Klepper, Psy.D.
Mercer University, 2018

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Rachel Knight, Ph.D.
Central Michigan University–Mount Pleasant, Michigan, 2012 

 

Assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorders

Integrating behavioral health into primary care, increasing access to care, anticipatory guidance and integrating behavioral health into well child visits, screening in primary care, psychological flexibility, education and training in integrated primary care

 

Brett R. Kuhn, Ph.D.
Oklahoma State University, 1992

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Sleep disorders, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), elimination disorders, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Publications include articles in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, Psychological Bulletin, Child & Family Behavior Therapy, Sleep, Clinical Pediatrics. 

 

Brittany Liebsack, Ph.D.

West Virginia University, 2019

 

Integrated behavioral health in primary care

 

Megan Morse, Ph.D.
Ball State University, 2013

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care and Comprehensive School Mental Health Program Faculty

 

Neuropsychological assessment, psychoeducational assessment, and pediatric internalizing disorders, lead clinician at several schools within Omaha Public Schools. Participation in research includes neuropsychological assessment for studies that measure the impact of medical conditions on pediatric development.

 

Lisa Neitzke, Ph.D.
Oklahoma State University–Stillwater, 2018

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Community support for adults with developmental disabilities, adult DD assessment, outpatient treatment for adults and young adults with developmental disabilities, functional behavior assessment, DD aging population.

 

Holly Roberts, Ph.D.
Illinois State University, 2006

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Rural behavioral health, assessment and treatment of ADHD, treatment outcomes, satisfaction and effectiveness at follow-up. Publications include articles in Behavioral Pediatrics, Behavior Modification, Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Parenting: Science and Practice, Proven Practice.

 

Mark D. Shriver, Ph.D., BCBA-D
University of Nebraska, 1994

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Academic and behavioral assessment for children with disabilities and school-related problems, parent training, child noncompliance. Publications include articles in School Psych Review, Journal of Evidence Based Practices for Schools, Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Therapy.

 

Tara M. Sjuts, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2014

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Integrating behavioral health into primary care, parent training, anticipatory guidance and integrating behavioral health into well child visits, psychological flexibility, mentoring in the field of mental and behavioral health, electronic health record keeping.

 

Whitney Strong-Bak, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska–Lincoln, 2018

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Interdisciplinary behavioral health care, early childhood development and assessment, parent training, internalizing disorders, externalizing disorders, developmental disabilities, autism screening and evaluation. Publications include articles in Journal of Behavioral Education, Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, and Psychology in the Schools.

Rachel Valleley, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska at Lincoln, 2001

Behavioral Pediatrics and Integrated Care Program Faculty

 

Impact of behavioral health clinics in primary care settings, clinical case studies, treatment integrity, parent training. Publications include articles in Journal of Behavioral Education; Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis; Pediatrics; Families, Systems & Health; Journal of Rural Mental Health.

 

Amanda Zangrillo, Psy.D.
University of Southern Maine, Maine-Gorham, 2012

Intensive Applied Behavior Analysis Program Faculty

 

Severe Behavior Program, Early Intervention, Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program, Autism and Severe Behavior Diagnostic Clinic Diagnostic Clinics

Patricia Zemantic, Ph.D.
University of Oregon–Eugene, Oregon, 2019 

 

Integrated Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders; autism screening and evaluation, early intervention

Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders Program Faculty

Courtney Burnette, Ph.D.
University of Miami, 2006

Differential diagnosis of children suspected of having autism spectrum disorder; early screening practices to identify young children at-risk for this diagnosis. Independent trainer on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2) and the Screening Tool for Autism in Toddlers (STAT).

 

Amy Drayton, Ph.D.
Eastern Michigan University, 2010

Assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorders, use of time out for disruptive behavior. Publications include articles in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Child and Family Behavior Therapy, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics, and Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Amanda Zangrillo, Psy.D., BCBA-D
University of Southern Maine, 2012

Assessment and treatment of severe behavior disorders, diagnostic evaluation for Autism Spectrum Disorders and related disorders. Publications include articles in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Behavioral Interventions, and Psychology in the Schools..

Bethany Hansen, PhD, BCBA-D
Oklahoma State University, 2014

Assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorders and social communication deficits associated with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disorders. Publication include articles in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Modification, Child & Family Behavior Therapy, and Behavior Analysis in Practice.

Rachel Knight, PhD
Central Michigan University, 2012

Assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorders; pediatric sleep disorders; behavior management and parent training. Publications include articles in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Child and Family Behavior Therapy, Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 

Munroe-Meyer Institute will hold virtual open houses and interviews in January.