Faculty

Dr. Kristin Duppong Hurley

Dr. Kristin Duppong Hurley Co-Director and Research Professor, Academy for Child and Family Well Being

Dr. Duppong Hurley has her Ph.D. in psychology with a specialization in applied program evaluation. She has more than 15 years of experience conducting research on services for children and families with or at-risk of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Dr. Duppong Hurley has considerable research experience relevant to the postdoctoral fellowship training grants. For example, she is currently the PI of an IES funded Goal 3 grant (R324A130180) to conduct an RCT investigating the efficacy of a parent-to-parent mentoring intervention to improve school engagement for middle school students with EBD. She is also the PI of a RCT examining the effectiveness of a family support intervention for youth with EBD for a non-profit organization. She is currently conducting pilot work examining the role of parental involvement with secondary students at-risk of EBD using national, longitudinal datasets. In addition to her focus on family interventions, she interested in improving service delivery and implementation. Dr. Duppong Hurley recently completed a NIMH-funded grant (R34 MH080941) on implementation science with youth in residential care with EBD diagnoses and previously was a Fellow with the Implementation Research Institute at Washington University (R25 MH080916-01A2 NIMH and VA). She was also a co-PI on a previous post-doctoral fellowship grant from IES (R324B110001).
Dr. Alex Trout

Dr. Alex Trout Co-Director and Research Professor, Academy for Child and Family Well Being, UNL

Dr. Trout earned her Ph.D. in EBD in 2003 and has spent the past decade working on developing and evaluating programs to meet the education and transition needs of children, families, and youth with or at-risk of high-incidence disabilities. She has experience with quantitative (e.g., RCTs, survey research) and qualitative (e.g., interviews) methodologies. Her research has been primarily funded through IES where she served as a co-PI for a Goal 2 development grant addressing the transition needs of high-risk youth with and at-risk of EBD and LD (R324B070034). Dr. Trout currently serves as PI on a Goal 3 (R324A120260) RCT assessing “On the Way Home,” a transition model she developed for high-risk youth and their families returning home from residential services. She is especially interested in how to support youth and families during service transition to experience success at home and in school. Dr. Trout also has a Goal 2 development grant addressing the health literacy needs of high school youth with high incidence disabilities (R324A160170). This work includes conducting focus groups with students, school professionals and families to develop the web-based health literacy intervention followed by feasibility pilot studies, including a small RCT. Dr. Trout has also served as a co-PI for an IES funded post-doctoral training grant in EBD (R324B110001) and OSEP funded doctoral training grant in EBD (H325D080034).
Dr. Matthew Lambert

Dr. Matthew Lambert Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, UNL

Dr. Lambert earned his doctorate in educational psychology with a focus on research design, measurement, and statistics and has substantial practical experience in applied behavior analysis and single-case design. He is currently focused on the application of latent variable modeling to the measurement science of assessing individuals with or at-risk for disabilities (in particular EBD and ADHD). He also currently serves as the lead statistician for the Barkley Memorial Center at Nebraska. In this capacity, he actively works on large-scale randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental and observational studies, and single-case studies. Dr. Lambert has expertise in quantitative methods including multilevel modeling and latent variable modeling as well as expertise in measurement science including advanced factor analysis techniques, item response theory, and Rasch modeling approaches.
Dr. W. Alex Mason

Dr. W. Alex Mason Director of Research, Boys Town National Research Institute for Child and Family Studies

Dr. Mason has held both research and faculty positions in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington. His research focuses on the developmental etiology and prevention of behavior disorders and related problems among adolescents and young adults. Dr. Mason is Principal Investigator of two NIDA-funded RO1 studies: one to develop and preliminarily test a family-focused program for the prevention of behavior disorders and substance abuse among at-risk teens and another to conduct secondary analyses of an existing data set to examine the role of childhood cumulative contextual risk in the development of substance abuse and related problems. Dr. Mason helps to supervise research activities for fellows at the Boys Town site.
Dr. Jacqueline Huscroft D’Angelo

Dr. Jacqueline Huscroft D’Angelo Assistant Research Professor, Academy for Child and Family Well Being, UNL

Dr. Huscroft-D’Angelo has her Ph.D. in educational studies with a specialization in special education and emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). She has more than 10 years of experience working with youth and families at-risk. Dr. Huscroft-D’Angelo has a variety of research and grant management experience working on several federally funded projects. Her roles have included grant management, collaboration with community agencies and schools, data collection and analyses as well as dissemination efforts. Currently, she is key personnel on three IES funded projects including (R324A120260) which focuses on aftercare and transition services for youth departing residential settings, (R324A160170) which is a project to develop a web-based health literacy curriculum for youth with high incidence disabilities, and (R324A130180) focused on investigating the efficacy of a parent-to-parent mentoring intervention to improve school engagement for middle school students with EBD. Dr. Huscroft-D’Angelo is also working with a team to conduct pilot work examining the role of parental involvement with secondary students at-risk of EBD as well as the feasibility of extending the parent-to-parent mentoring intervention to rural settings. Prior to her role in the Academy, Dr. Huscroft-D’Angelo was a research faculty member at Texas Christian University in the Alice Neeley Special Education Research and Service Institute.
Dr. Ronald Thompson

Dr. Ronald Thompson Director, Boys Town National Research Institute for Child and Family Studies

Dr. Thompson has 30 years of experience as a clinician, program administrator, consultant, applied researcher and research administrator and has held faculty positions in the Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha and the Department of Human Development at the University of Kansas. He has published more than 50 professional and scientific papers. Research interests include program evaluation, intervention and services research, and evidence-based practice.
Dr. Jonathan C. Huefner

Dr. Jonathan C. Huefner Research Scientist, Boys Town

Dr. Huefner has held faculty positions in the Psychology Departments at California State University-Bakersfield and Brigham Young University. He has more than 20 years of experience in conducting and consulting on scale development, research design and statistical analysis, and has 42 peer-reviewed publications. He has particular interest in the impact of psychotropic medication in treating children with EBD, program effectiveness, longitudinal data analysis, long-term follow-up research, and the development of measurement scales using Rasch, IRT and traditional psychometric methods.