Teachers

Academic Year Workshops #1 for CS Discoveries & CS Principles Cohorts 2018-19!

Register by Saturday, August 25th!

September 22, 2018 | 9:00 am - 4:00 pm | Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln 

This is one of the four 1-day CS education workshops that we will be organizing for the 2018-19 cohorts of 31 middle school teachers and 22 high school teachers all across Nebraska. These workshops are designed to prepare CS teachers for teaching the CS Discoveries and AP CS Principles courses in their classes throughout the school year. Our facilitators are experienced CS teachers and are also the Code.org-certified facilitators who went through the Code.org facilitator training. Our workshops are hands-on, authentic, practical, and based on the proven instructional models. If you are interested, please fill out the interest form below to receive information on our professional learning program 2019-20. 

Fill out this interest form to join our contact list

Professional Learning for Middle and High School Teachers to Teach Computer Science!

Are you currently teaching or going to teach one of Code.org's computer science courses (see below) in your school?  If you are and need high-quality training, consider applying for the corresponding Professional Learning Programs. The programs kick off with a 5-day summer workshop where you'll have an opportunity to work hands-on with the curriculum and meet other teachers from your area. Throughout the year, Code.org and UNL Tech EDGE will offer online support for upcoming units, forum support, and 1-day quarterly workshops. You don't need any prior computer science experience to get started. 

6-10th grade: Computer Science Discoveries

For teachers in 6th - 10th grade classrooms, Code.org's Computer Science Discoveries course is a greate place to start. The course can be taught as a semester or full-year introduction and covers a broad range of topics such as physical computing, building websites, programming and learning about data.

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CS Discoveries Professional Learning Program
9-12th grade: Computer Science Principles

If you are teaching 9 - 12th grade students, Code.org's Computer Science Principles course can be taught as an AP or non-AP course. Either way, there are no prerequisites required. The course is designed to be far more than a traditional introduction to programming - it's a regorous, engaging, and approachable course. It explores many of the big, foundational ideas of computing so all students understand how these concepts are transforming the world we live in.

CS Principles Professional Learning Program

Professional Learning Program for Elementary School Teachers to Teach Computer Science!

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Introducing Code Studio for grades K-5

For teachers in K-5 classrooms, Code.org's Computer Science Fundamentals course is a greate place to start. The course can be implemented by unit or over the course of a semester. New to teaching compugter science? No worries! Our high-quality, 1-day workshops along with online forums will give you the knowledge and confidence to teach the course! 

CS Fundamentals Professional Learning Program

If you are interested in joining in the Professional Learning Program 2018-19 for CS Fundamentals (elementary school), sign up below to be added to our contact list.

Join our contact list
Student Practices & Skills

Lessons in CS Fundamentals help students work in a wide array of contexts, but these experiences are tied together by a core set of practices and skills they develop throughout the course. These student practices provide coherence and serve as helpful reminders of the high-level skills and dispositions they should be continually developing. 

Tips to Keep the Course Active & Engaging

The  classroom practices for CS Fundamentals are strategies used repreatedly in many different lessons and units. These classroom practices (i.e., lead learner, pair programming, authentic choice, and journaling) are at the core of the ways the curriculum is designed, as we believe these are critical to positive classroom culture and ultimately student learning. Here are quick tips that reflect these classroom practices.